Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Hemp Can Save The Planet!: What Does Lemon Meringue Pie Have To Do With Hemp ...

 Activists Present USVI Senators with a Lemon Meringue Pie in support of Bill No. 29-0350



August 15, 2012 - ST. CROIX -  Celebrities and activists associated with volunteer group Hemp Can Save The Planetpresented USVI Senators with a locally made gourmet Lemon Meringue Pie on behalf of USVI Culinary Ambassador, Chef Theo Gumbs, filmmaker Melissa Balin; the late, great civil rights activist,Jack Herer, and countless celebrity activist Hemp Can Save The Planet volunteers, in support of Bill No. 29-0350 - An Act to conduct a referendum on the issue of promoting the production, processing, manufacture and distribution of Industrial Hemp in the Virgin Islands.  Senator Terrance "Positive" Nelson, the first and only Rastafarian senator in the Virgin Islands, is bringing the bill forward. Senator Shawn-Michael Malone of St. Thomas has signed on as the bill’s co-sponsor. 

The pie was accompanied with a note that read:

This gift is a delicious token symbolizing the following food for thought:
The lemons used to make this gourmet Lemon Meringue Pie are not indigenous to the Virgin Islands and must be imported.  While the Mainland is the #1 Importer of Industrial Hemp (which much like a lemon, does NOT have psychotropic effects), the United States is currently the only Industrialized Nation that Prohibits the growing of Industrial Hemp, due to antiquated laws based on studies that have since been scientifically debunked.  As one of the remaining “Non-Self Governing Territories” on the United Nations’ list, we enthusiastically encourage the United States Virgin Islands to explore the economic and agricultural solutions presented by what was already being referred to as a “Billion-Dollar Crop” back in 1936, with the USVI Territory having already experienced almost 20 years of legal Cannabis Hemp use without incident, after Denmark’s sale to America in 1917, until Prohibition was implemented under false pretenses in 1937.

The lemon meringue pie was also accompanied with the verbiage of the resolution being presented to the United Nations declaring the End of the Prohibition of Cannabis Hemp, through an online petition on Change.Org.  Filmmaker Melissa Balin says, "I don't think it is a common or advisable policy for government officials to accept food stuffs from constituents, but when the gift is coming from a two-time Iron Chef Winner, who is the Culinary Ambassador for the entire USVI, those are exceptionally delectable circumstances worthy of consideration.  Still, whether the Senators actually eat the pie, or not, we hope it will bring a global awareness to the core issues surrounding Industrial Hemp as a sustainable resource."

National Lemon Meringue Pie Day is celebrated in the United States on August 15th.  To find out more about the many uses of Industrial Hemp, please visit http://www.VoteHemp.org






Hemp Can Save The Planet!: What Does Lemon Meringue Pie Have To Do With Hemp ...:   Activists Present USVI Senators with a Lemon Meringue Pie in support of Bill No. 29-0350 August 15, 2012 - ST. CROIX -   Celebritie...





Tuesday, August 9, 2016

MOhemp Energy Startup Decision Time



Planned Kenaf Tests for 1st Round of Kenaf Plants

Question on sharing information on test results: Decision Time: to make the info public or private? How much should be shared?

Kenaf Test Plant Documentation


Timeline 1st Batch Kenaf Test Plants:
  1. started from seed
  2. Germination
  3. Moved Outdoors
  4. 1st Transplanting
  5. Flowers Developed

  1. All Above Previously Published 

    1. {Decision Time will this be public or private information. If you go public: 1) how far or how much information should or 2) will be shared?  What if any should be kept private?}
  1. Harvesting
    1. Height above ground
    2. Height with Root System
    3. Weight of Total Plant
    4. Weight of Root System with 4 inch Stem Cut {Ave Farm Equip Cut Bar Height}
    5. Weight of Stem, Branches, etc before dissection
      1. Weight of Individual parts Wet and Dry
Description
Weight Wet
Weight Dry
Fibers


Core


Lignin


Bast


Leaves


Branches


      1.   Fibers
      2.   Core
      3.   Lignin
      4. Bast
  1. Liquefied Lignin Data






























  1. Lignin Burn Temperature Testing

Before Temp
After Temp
? will it burn in liquid form?


When applied to Charcoal


Notebook Paper


wood shavings

  1. Lignin Testing Dry State:









  1. Fiber Data
    1. Length
    2. Size
    3. Strength
  2. Core Data
    1. Length
    2. Size
    3. Strength?

Monday, August 8, 2016

HempLogic: HEMP "GRAPHENE

By: Leah Maurer 
Source: dopemagazine.com

Tech Thursday: Hemp "Graphene": Changing Our Perception Of Modern Technology


Although industrial hemp is only permitted to be grown in a few areas within the United States, this variety of Cannabis sativa never ceases to amaze. Hemp’s many uses from food to paper to modern technologies such as hempcrete are just astounding. The most ground breaking of these though, is hemp “graphene.”
To explain, regular graphene is comprised of a two-dimensional, hexagonal honeycomb lattice layer of tightly packed carbon atoms, and is one of the strongest, lightest and most conductive compounds ever discovered. It is considered one of the best materials for supercapacitor electrodes. The term was also used in early descriptions of carbon nanotubes, and can be considered a type of nanotechnology. Many of graphene’s uses are in the area of energy storage; some uses that are under development include electronics,biological engineeringfiltration and strong, lightweight composite materials.
However, a scientist by the name of Dr. David Mitlin, from Clarkson University in New York, says he’s found a way to manufacture hemp waste into a material that appears to be better than graphene. Dr. Mitlin and his team were able to recycle leftover hemp-based fiber, cook it down and then dissolve it until carbon nanoseheets that resembled the structure of graphene were left behind. They proceeded to build these nanosheets into powerful energy-storing supercapacitors with high energy density, thus creating a hemp based “graphene.” Essentially, Mitlin’s team discovered a process for converting fibrous hemp waste into a unique graphene-like nanomaterial that many say outperforms graphene.
Creating this graphene-like hemp material costs only a fraction of regular graphene production. Graphene costs as much as $2,000 per gram to manufacture, while the hemp-based nanomaterial can be manufactured for less than $500 per ton. To give proper perspective, there are 907,185 grams in one ton.
Hemp professionals and activists in Oregon and elsewhere are thrilled about this new technology and its potential for energy. Ben Christensen, owner of Oregon Hemp Works in Portland, said, “As a renewable energy major and hemp business owner, I find this very exciting. One of the bigger challenges with renewable energy is storage. I often find hemp being left out of the renewable energy conversation, but I feel you can’t really talk about renewable energy or sustainability unless hemp is being talked about as well. It also seems that when hemp is introduced as a replacement, it is just as good as what it’s replacing and even better in a lot of cases.”
Amy Peradotta, hemp activist and chairwoman of the Portland Women Grow chapter, agreed. She expressed, “Using hemp cellulose to replace graphene in supercapacitor batteries will change how we store energy and how we mass produce electronic products from computers and phones to electric cars. Imagine a future where your electric car battery is made with hemp supercapacitor electrodes, the body of the car is made with nontoxic, lightweight hemp cellulose composite materials and the interior door panels and upholstery are made from hemp fiber. Then, we can also use hemp supercapacitors to store renewable energy for our indoor cannabis grow houses made of hempcrete. Pair that with solar panels and you have a sustainably designed, energy efficient cannabis production facility.”
Most people don’t understand the truly diverse value of hemp. Cultures have relied on this hardy plant for centuries to produce textiles such as clothing, fabric and paper. Today, hemp is also used for food, fuel, medicine, building materials and plastics. Now with the energy storage industry starting to take notice, perhaps more government authorities will take a closer look at this plant.
Joy Beckerman, principal at Seattle-based Hemp Ace International and a 20+ year veteran in the industrial hemp movement said, “As activists and entrepreneurs, we simply did not see this coming 25 years ago. No one was sufficiently intellectual back then to predict the unique and exponential power within micro fibrils from hemp bast fiber or hemp’s ability to completely revolutionize the most critical areas of research and development. Graphite whisker and carbon nanotube are highest in stiffness and strength, but they are severely cost-prohibitive. Hemp cellulose nanocrystals are a considerably low cost nanoparticle, which makes them enormously attractive and competitive when one looks at the larger picture including price, availability, toxicity and sustainability.”
To think that the cannabis plant can supplement modern technology so dramatically is incredible. This only reaffirms why we must continue to defend our plant everywhere and push the federal government to deschedule this plant. It is time that hemp be researched, grown and mass produced for its infinite uses and unexplored technological applications.


HempLogic: HEMP "GRAPHENE: By:  Leah Maurer   Source:  dopemagazine.com Although industrial hemp is only permitted to be grown in a few areas within the United S...









Kenaf Plant Timeline Pictures





Kenaf Stem is over 1 inch in Diameter
Kenaf Stem is over 1 inch in Diameter

2 weeks prior to this photo a windstorm blew the Kenaf plants over breaking 2 branches - somehow the leaves have stayed green on the broken stem as not all the branches outer cover was severed
2 weeks prior to this photo a windstorm blew the Kenaf plants over breaking 2 branches - somehow the leaves have stayed green on the broken stem as not all the branches outer cover was severed

Kenaf Plants Towering over a 6 foot tall standard wood fence
Kenaf Plants Towering over a 6 foot tall standard wood fence

2nd batch of invention test kenaf plants growing in garden plot less than 2 weeks old
2nd batch of invention test kenaf plants growing in garden plot less than 2 weeks old

Kenaf Seedlings less than 1 week after seeding.
Kenaf Seedlings less than 1 week after seeding.

close to 1 inch diameter Kenaf Stem
close to 1 inch diameter Kenaf Stem

Kenaf Plant Height to top of planter 92 inches
Kenaf Plant Height to top of planter 92 inches

92 inch kenaf plant height
92 inch kenaf plant height

Windstorm blew over the Kenaf Plants- only 2 branches were broke on 1 of the plants see earlier photo
Windstorm blew over the Kenaf Plants- only 2 branches were broke on 1 of the plants see earlier photo


Kenaf Root System growing out of the planter
Kenaf Root System growing out of the planter

Little Green Thumbs helping with Kenaf plants 6 foot tall wood fence background
Little Green Thumbs helping with Kenaf plants 6 foot tall wood fence background


Kenaf Flower
Kenaf Flower












Not too long ago I planted the Kenaf Plant Seeds for the Hemp Inventions!
Not too long ago I planted the Kenaf Plant Seeds for the Hemp Inventions!


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